Tag Archives: hunting

2017-2018 Hunting Laws Released

The 2017-2018 Summary of Hunting Laws has just been released by IFW.

There is also a new Quick Reference Guide available that includes license & permit needs, legal shooting hours chart and the hunting seasons/limit chart. Migratory Game Bird info is included.

The Summary of Trapping Laws will be released at a later date.

Good Bears Are Coming In

I ran the bait line today and refreshed hit baits and pulled the cards on the trail cameras. This year is shaping up to be a great hunt for our sports coming up to Tucker Ridge…

So far, all the bears hitting the baits are shooters. We haven’t seen any sows with cubs unlike last year when we had a sow and cubs take over a bait. We let them have it and it’s paying dividends this year. I have those yearlings and the now dry sow on camera; they look pretty good!

Here are some highlight photos of what you are going to be hunting this fall…As the weather starts to cool in coming weeks, these bruins should start feeding more frequently, and in daylight.

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2017 Fall Black Bear Hunt Packets Now Available

Our 2017 Black Bear over bait hunt packets are now available for download or mailing.

2017 Bear Hunt Packet – Bear Packet

Game Processing – D R Cutting Price Sheet

Taxidermist – DeLaites Taxidermy Brochure

This year we are offering an American Plan hunt with all meals provided by a live in camp cook. Camps are limited to 5 hunters per week. The cost is $1450 per hunter (Licenses not included)

You will not find a better opportunity to hunt Maine black bears on a working salary…our motto is “For hunters, by hunters”

Contact us with questions or to secure a spot..

 

An overview of Stand #1 site – Southeastern Tucker Ridge

Our Stand #1 location is prime black bear and whitetail deer country. Numerous heavily used game trails network through this site.

Aerial view of Stand #1 location on southeast Tucker Ridge
Aerial view of Stand #1 location on southeast Tucker Ridge – CLICK TO ENLARGE

Continue reading An overview of Stand #1 site – Southeastern Tucker Ridge

Maine Moose Permit Deadline Fast Approaching

A reminder from the Maine Dept of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife:

Don’t miss your opportunity to apply for the 2016 Maine Moose Permit Lottery

 

Hunters who dream about the hunt of a lifetime are reminded that application deadlines are quickly approaching!

Paper applications for the 2016 Maine moose permit lottery must be postmarked by April 1, 2016, or delivered to 284 State Street in Augusta by 5:00 PM on April 1, 2016.

Paper applications are available by contacting the Department at (207) 287-8000 or from our website at www.mefishwildlife.com.

The deadline to apply online is 11:59pm on May 16, 2016. The online application process is fast and simple and provides instant confirmation. To apply online, please visit https://www5.informe.org/online/moose/.

Applicants are awarded bonus points for each consecutive year that they have applied for the lottery since 1998 without being selected and each bonus point gives the applicant an additional chance in the drawing.

Bonus points are earned at the rate of one per year for years one to five, two per year for years six to 10, three per year for years 11 to 15 and 10 per year for years 16 and beyond.

Since 2011, applicants can skip a year and not lose their bonus points. So if they applied in 2014 but not in 2015, they still have their points available if they apply in 2016.

The moose permit drawing will take place on June 11, 2016 at Kittery Trading Post in Kittery, Maine.
For more information about moose hunting in Maine and the moose permit lottery, please visit: http://www.maine.gov/ifw/licenses_permits/lotteries/moose/index.htm

The Christmas Hare

Headshot

By John Floyd

Christmas morning this year was certainly a gift. The unseasonable temps made it feel like we were back in Pennsylvania. It was a beautiful, bright morning and the air was clean and crisp. When I first met the day, the thermometer on the front porch read 32 degrees. A far cry from the norms of single digits expected this time of year.

I stoked the wood stove, then added a few logs. Moira brought her tea and a cup of coffee for me, and we settled by the tree. Our dogs Chuck and CJ were already settled, having the experience of Christmas past and knowing what was wrapped in some of those packages. You see, our dogs open their gifts themselves, with the term “open” used liberally.

After the exchanging of gifts and the calls made to family and friends wishing all a Merry Christmas, I cast an eye toward Moira and asked, “We still on?”

“You betcha!” came the reply. With only a week left, my grouse season wasn’t over just yet.

Moira grabbed her gear and ushered CJ, our Beagle, out to the Jeep. When I grabbed the 20 gauge from the gun cabinet and my vest, our Yellow Lab, Chuck, needed no ushering of any sort. He knew what that meant.

We had only recently started bringing Chuck out into the woods to flush ruffed grouse for me. His enthusiasm certainly made up for his lack of experience, as I had three times more flushes in a day than I had hunting alone. These hunts were intended to be an introduction for Chuck and just to have fun. We all could get out, get some air and exercise and hopefully put some grouse in the freezer as a bonus.

What a perfect way to spend a beautiful Christmas morning in Maine.20151209_150623

We parked at the head of a logging road I had some luck at previously and got geared up. CJ on the leash because when that ‘ol girl gets her nose down, she suddenly becomes deaf and gets out too far. Moira isn’t having that.

We moved down the trail with the sun in our eyes, Chuck working the edges like he knows what he’s doing. I suspect he does somewhat, he hails from hunting bloodlines. We just never put him under the gun back in Pennsylvania. Limited opportunities as they were.

As we climbed a hill, approaching the entrance to a clear cut on my right, I asked Moira to hold back with CJ. I knew this was prime habitat and had flushed birds there before. Chuck and I moved up into the clear cut and I put him to the right side of me, ahead about 5 yards.

“Where the birds at?” I asked him.  He bee-lined to the edge of some bramble near a log and the air exploded with the unmistakable beat of “Thunder Chicken” wings.

A big male grouse was airborne and moving from my right to left, flying low. I brought the gun up, but didn’t have a shot. Remember my inexperienced bird dog? He was jumping through the air nipping after that bird. We’ll have to work on that.

The bird cleared Chuck then did what ruffed grouse do. He hit the afterburners and like a fighter jet, made a hard right turn toward the safety of the tree line. I snapped a shot off, but knew I was behind him. Those are some fast birds.

Moira and CJ joined us in the clear cut and we formed a plan. Knowing grouse fly to safety in about a hundred yards or so, we decided to move up through the cut the rest of the way, check for any more hanging tight, then try to flush the bird again. I saw where he went and knew another skidder trail was behind the treeline.

We reached the skidder trail and once again Moira held CJ back while Chuck and I advanced. “Where the birds at Chuck?” I asked him. Once again, he turned right into the edge of the treeline off the trail and flushed that bird a second time! This time I got a shot off quickly, but that bird got into the thick stuff in the blink of an eye. I knew I was ahead of him this time, but it was pretty thick in there. Chuck and I went in to investigate.

“Find the bird. Find the bird, Chuck.” We quartered the area, but didn’t find a bird. I wasn’t too surprised, I didn’t hear the tell tale sound of the bird down “Whump” when they hit the deck. Nevertheless, I was proud of Chuck. He had a great morning. He was getting bored standing still in the woods while I marked the spot for future reference, so I sent him back out to Moira on the trail.

As I put my phone back in my vest, I saw a flash to my right front. Was that the belly of my grouse? Was it just some snow falling from an overloaded spruce?20151225_122351

Nope! It was a fast moving Snowshoe Hare that decided it was “Go time”. I brought up the gun, got in front and touched it off. The hare went down and I walked in after it.

I came out to the trail grinning. Moira asked, “Did you get that grouse?” I replied, “I got something!”

“You got a Snowshoe? It’s beautiful!” said Moira. And it was. A big beautiful male. The dogs were excited and so were we. What a way to cap off a great morning hunt.

I learned something new that Christmas morning. Always be prepared for an unexpected gift in the Maine woods.